Articles Posted in Criminal Law

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You, like many people, may wonder whether the police are allowed to enter your home without a warrant—particularly if you currently live in an apartment or a dorm room on your college campus.

The Fourth Amendment does provide citizens the right to be secure in their home against unreasonable searches and seizures. In most cases, this right cannot be violated without a warrant which is based on probable cause, however there are exceptions.

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Arbitrary searches of your vehicle are generally illegal, however, like searches of your home, there are exceptions which can be used by the police to search your car.

There is also usually more leeway given to police to search your vehicle than to search your home. The exceptions to the laws governing vehicle searches include:

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Most of us are under the impression that we cannot be arrested unless the police have a warrant in hand. Unfortunately, this is not always the case, and your arrest could well hinge on the premise of probable cause.

The Fourth Amendment allows police officers to make an arrest, so long as probable cause exists. Probable cause is meant to prevent police states stopping law enforcement from arresting those they perceive as a threat without sufficient justification to back up that perception.

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Many people see the crime of shoplifting as a very minor one, with few repercussions or penalties. In fact, if you are convicted of shoplifting in the state of Mississippi, you could face serious consequences, even finding yourself behind bars. In other words, your life, both present and future, can be altered in ways you may not have imagined when you shoplift an item. As many as ten million people have been caught shoplifting over the past five years—while about a quarter of those were teens or children, the vast majority were adults.

When you consider the most common shoplifted items include baby formula and meat, it seems as though many shoplifters may truly be taking items they did not pay for out of financial need. Most people who are caught shoplifting really had no intention of committing a crime when they entered the store. Some people shoplift out of financial need, others on impulse, and still others honestly meant to pay for the item—it was truly an accident when they walked out of the store with the unpaid item. Whatever the reasons behind the shoplifting incident, you need a Mississippi attorney who can work hard on your behalf to minimize the potential consequences.

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Unlike robbery charges, burglary charges are typically associated with the unlawful entry and criminal intent involving a structure when there are no victims present.

A structure can be a house, business, commercial property or even an automobile. Because there is not typically a person or victim present in this scenario, burglaries are almost always non-violent.

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Earlier this week, two people were arrested in connection with car burglaries in the Clinton area.

According to WJTV News Channel 12, Jimmy Wayne Hughes and Larry Konnor Hawkins have been charged with two counts of auto burglary and one county of petty larceny. Hawkins is also facing an additional charge of possession of a controlled substance.

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In drug arrest cases in Jackson and around the nation, there is a fine line between misdemeanor and felony drug charges.

The difference between these two types of charges can impact the rest of your life, so if you’re facing any type of drug arrest, it’s essential to speak with a criminal defense attorney who has proven drug case experience as soon as possible.

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Earlier this week, a man was arrested in connection with a drug bust in South Jackson. According to WJTV News Channel 12, the bust went down on the 160 block of Ferguson Drive after an alleged undercover purchase.

The Hinds County Sheriff’s Department’s Narcotics Division arrested 67-year-old David Morehouse.

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Forgery is a specific kind of fraud. It is the process of making, adapting, or imitating objects, statistics or documents with the intent to deceive. Forgery can include the sale of those forged documents or goods, or the use of a forged trademark from a legitimate business. Forgery investigations are very complex, and can last for many months. The long list of white collar crimes include forgery. Forgery, and other crimes like it generally involve stealing money through the use of deception.

Forgery differs from a blue collar crime such as burglary—which also involves theft—in that there is seldom a threat of physical force, rather money is illegally obtained via financial transaction. Many forgery and other white collar crimes cross state borders, therefore may be federal crimes which are investigated by the FBI. Both federal courts and Mississippi courts have serious penalties for forgery. Examples of forgery include:

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In the state of Mississippi—as in most states—the primary differences between drug possession charges and drug trafficking charges is the amount of the illegal substance in your possession, as well as whether you crossed a state line with the substance in your possession. The next major difference between the two charges is the severity of the penalties.

A drug trafficking conviction can have severe enough penalties to completely alter the course of your life. A more specific comparison of the two charges includes: